Golf Stretches For Back Pain – Easy Ways to Relieve Pain From a Golf Swing

Golf stretches for lower back that is part of your overall core conditioning needed and proper biomechanics of golf as a whole are both areas that are often not discussed on most golf sites. It is surprising just how many golfers have poor flexibility at various points throughout the golf swing. It seems that when you go to the golf store to buy clubs, the salesman will push the clubs they want you to use based upon how flexible you are. This is a problem because although your flexibility may be advanced for other sports or exercises, such as dance, it is quite difficult to achieve in golf. If you know you have an issue with flexibility, it is important to speak with a professional before making any purchases.

Golf Stretches For Back Pain – Easy Ways to Relieve Pain From a Golf Swing

 

It is becoming a more popular thing to do amongst golfers to strengthen their lower back before hitting the ball. Many golfers that hit the ball poorly actually have an issue with lower back pain. Most of this is due to improper mechanics, poor posture, and weak muscles that connect the pelvis to the ribcage. Once these muscles become weak, the golfers back cannot support the weight of the player and in turn the entire body breaks down.

 

One of the most common golf stretches for the lower back pain is what is called the cat stretch. This is done while standing on one leg in a lunge position. One golfer, after seeing me doing this exercise told me that he usually does this exercise but will do it when he feels something is wrong. In other words, if there is something wrong with his golf swing, he will do this exercise to make sure he does not hurt himself. Another golfer said, “I do this all the time, (the cat stretch) it’s an old-school technique”.

 

Many golf exercises that golfers do for strengthening of muscles also include stretching. One exercise is called the boat pose and is done by kneeling on one leg in a squatting position. You should be leaning forward slightly on your elbow. You will want to close your eyes and hold this pose for 15 seconds and then slowly return to normal golf swings.

 

One of my golf buddies has an exercise that is called the hang leg golf swings. He sits on a step in the grass and holds his foot up so that his back is straight. Then he swings his arms back and forth like he was trying to do a back stretch. He then brings his feet back to the point he started out and continues in this type of motion. I have seen this done by other golfers as well, but this is a very effective stretch for the back.

 

Another back stretch, I like to use for golf swings is what is called the cat pose. This is done by kneeling down with a ball beneath the buttocks. You will hold this position for about two seconds. You will then bring your butt up to the same point that you started off with and repeat the process. To get better results, you will want to do the golf swing several times before switching to a regular back stretch.

 

There are also back stretches you can do that requires you to lie on your side and look up at the sky. To do this stretch, you will want to kneel next to a wall, while holding your ankle with both hands. Then you will bring each of your legs up to your chest, using them to support your head and your back. You will hold this position in place for about two seconds before switching to the next stretch. All these golf back stretches are great for strengthening the back and improving flexibility, but they are especially helpful if you have some issues with soreness or weakness in the area.

 

Another one of the more basic back stretches is to take a big swing and make a push. To do this, you will want to stand next to a golf ball with both feet apart. Next, without taking your eyes off of the ball, simply take a big swing and push off from the hips, as high as you can. Do this several times, resting in between each swing. By doing golf stretches for back pain, you can improve not only your golf swing but also reduce the likelihood of getting injured.